How to Decide Which Idea to Write Next

We writers usually have at least half a dozen different ideas floating around our heads at any given time – sometimes more. So how on earth do we decide which ONE idea we’re going to chose when we sit down to write the next book? And then how do we stick with that ONE idea and not jump from story to story to story?

You need to figure this out before you sit down to write, because if you can’t focus on just ONE story you’ll never finish any of them. I know you want to publish your novel and finishing it is the first step toward that dream.

If you don’t have a clear idea of what you’re going to write next, don’t worry! I’m here to help. The first thing I want you to do is choose 3 story ideas that currently appeal to you. It’s important to keep this list to 3 so you don’t get overwhelmed making the decision.

Once you have your 3 ideas, see if any one of them jumps out at you more than the others. If so, great! You can stop here and start writing.

But if not, that’s ok! Write a short summary for each of the ideas. Which one is the most fleshed out? Which one is most exciting to you? Which one does your gut tell you will make the best novel?

If you still can’t decide, take a poll! Post a very brief description¬†(no more than 2-3 sentences) of each of the 3 ideas on your social media platform of choice and ask readers which one they’d most like to read next.

Now that you know what you’re going to write you need to prepare to keep the other ideas at bay, because they will inevitably rear their colorfully viscious heads, each vying for your precious attention. Stay strong! Don’t be tempted by these wayward mistresses. They are fickle and will abandon you as surely as they came. Or worse, tear you from your true story love forever.

As unrelated ideas come to you, pause to write them down in the notebook or file where you keep new ideas, and then immediately go back to writing your original idea. This may be difficult in the beginning. There’s this little thing called FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out. Or worse, FOBS – Fear Of Being Successful. (OK, I admit, I just made that one up. But it’s a real thing…if you never finish a story you’ll never have to face the trappings of success. Or failure.)

“But this idea is really great, too. What if, when I finally do go to write it, it’s faded and doesn’t excite me anymore?”

“NYT Best Selling Author Jane Doe just hit #1 with an idea in this vein. I should write that instead because obviously that’s what’s hot right now.”

STOP

Trust your instincts. They’re smarter than you give them credit for. You chose the original idea for a reason so have a little faith in yourself. Whatever your excuse, I promise you I can debunk it.

In the first example, if the second idea is as exciting as it seems to be, it will still be exciting when you finish the current one and start writing it. And if it isn’t, well, chances are you would have quickly grown bored with it if you’d chosen to write that one first.

For the second, trying to follow the market can be dangerous. Readers are fickle and their tastes change almost daily it seems. Just because that idea is hot now doesn’t mean it will be 9 months down the road when you publish your version of it.

I know it can be hard to stick with just a single idea when writing a novel. But if you do you’ll get this one finished much more quickly, and it will be a stronger book for it.

XO,
Jen

p.s. If you need more help choosing a story and sticking with it to completion, click here to grab your spot in Dream to Draft, a 5 month 1-1 coaching service that helps you outline, create characters, and complete the first draft of your book.

6 Things to Plan for Your Writing in the New Year

You’re recovering from the holiday food binge, preparing your liver for the NYE booze binge, and wondering what to do about your writing in the new year. It’s time to sit down and figure out a plan, because we both know that nothing will ever get done unless you make a plan and give yourself deadlines.

It took me nearly 4 years to get my first book, Divided, published. I wrote the draft for National Novel Writing Month in November of 2008. I reworked it and reworked it and put it away for a while and reworked it some more and put it away again….you get the point. I wanted to publish it, but it wasn’t until I finally told myself, “Jen, you are going to publish this book on March 11, 2013 OR ELSE.” Once I had that date in my head it became real. And being real meant that I actually had to do the work to finish it.

And guess what? I published it on March 11, 2013!

To help you reach your writing goal, here’s a list of things to plan for the new year.

Decide what your goals for the year will be

I recommend having a maximum of 2 big goals each year. As an example, my 2 goals for 2018 are to publish my next book and get booked out with Dream. Write. Sell. Once you know what your goals are, follow these steps:

  • Break it down into tiny chunks
  • Write each step down, with deadlines, where you’ll see it every day
  • Find an accountability partner

Plan your social media posting

This doesn’t have to be super intense or detailed, but it is an important piece of your writing business. To start you can just figure out what you want to post, which platforms you want to use (where do your readers spend the most time?) and how often you want to post. Write this down to remind you of it every day.

Make a reading list for the year

Include a book or 2 on the craft of writing, but read for enjoyment. Great writers are voracious readers. Read widely so you can see what works for other authors and what doesn’t work in their stories. Read fiction, read non-fiction, read biographies and memoirs, read sci-fi and epic fantasy and chick lit and mysteries. The more varied your reading, the better a writer you will become, and the more ideas you’ll get for your own stories.

Revamp your writing space

Whether you have a dedicated writing space or a spot on the couch, now’s a great time to spruce it up. Start the year with a clean, inviting, distraction-free workspace to help you get the most out of your writing time.

Feed your creativity

If all we ever did was hide behind our computers and tap away at the keyboard we’d quickly run out of ideas for new stories. We need to get out into the world and have new experiences! I try to do something different once a month. Examples range from a day at the zoo or art museum to a few hours sitting in a coffee shop or park with my notebook while people watching and free-writing. I don’t use this time to work on any current work in progress. It is solely for creative flights of fancy.

All the “fun” money stuff

I’ll admit this made the bottom of the list because it’s something I tend to forget about until the last minute, but I’m going to change that this year. You may have heard about the new tax bill that passed recently, so it’s a really good time to talk to your accountant and figure out how the changes are going to affect you and your writing business. I also suggest figuring out what your expenses will be for the year – cover design, editing costs, marketing, etc. – so you can budget for it.

Most of these things are fairly simple to plan and I’d love to help you with them. Sign up for Stop Dreaming. Start Writing 1-1 coaching package to create a fool-proof writing plan for the year!

XO,
Jen

The Writing Process: Idea to Publication Explained

If you’re new to the world of publishing, you probably don’t even know where to begin. Let me help you out with that. Keep in mind the process will be slightly different for each writer, so I’ll keep it high level.

Self-Publishing

    • *Write book (duh)
    • *Edit book
    • *Design cover
    • *Format book
    • *Publish
    • *Marketing

That may seem like a lot, but it’s pretty simple compared to traditional publishing. Now, I don’t have direct experience with traditional publishing myself, but I’ve read a lot, attended lots of workshops, and listened to a lot of podcasts, so I have a pretty good idea how it works.

    • *Write book (duh)
    • ***(unless you’re writing non-fiction. Then it’s best to send proposals before starting your work.)
    • *Edit book
    • *Query agents
    • *Sign contract with agent
    • *Agent queries publishing houses
    • *Sign contract with publishing house

From here on out, everything is completely out of your hands

    • *Publisher will have their in-house editor go through your manuscript
    • *You change manuscript based on their edits, sometimes going back and forth with editor
    • *In-house cover designer creates cover based on what they think your book is about. (They likely haven’t read the book.)
    • *Copywriters create back cover blurb based on what they think the book is about, or from their memory of when they read it months prior.
    • *Publish
    • *Marketing (You still have to do a lot of your own marketing, even with traditional publishing.)

That’s a LOT more steps, and you have a LOT less control with traditional publishing. You also only get on average 15% of the sales, where as a self-published author you get 100%.

I know it sounds like I’m kind of dogging traditional publishing. I do intend to publish a book this route one day just so I can have the experience. You have to do your research and evaluate your options to decide which route is best for you.

So what do you think? Which path do you think you’d like to go down? Whichever you choose, I can help you every step of the way with my coaching program. Check it out!

Happy writing,
Jen